Category Archives: Tips & Tricks

Introducing Ipro Insights! Ep. 2: EDRM – Processing and Review

Check out our 2nd installment of Ipro Insights! Each week, our in-house experts will give you a quick look into some of the most common challenges facing the legaltech industry. In this segment, Ipro trainer, Cesar Sandoval, continues taking us through the EDRM, focusing on processing and review. Stay tuned for more! Special thanks to our very own Ipro Product Manager, Dan Carroll for our great illustrations.

Introducing Ipro Insights! Ep. 1: EDRM – Info Gov through Collection

We’re excited to announce Ipro Insights, where each week, our in-house experts will give you a quick look into some of the most common challenges facing the legaltech industry. For our first video series, Cesar Sandoval, from the Ipro Training Team, gives us a breakdown of each stage of the EDRM. Stay tuned for more!

In this episode of Ipro Insights you’ll learn: 

  •  The role of Information Governance in eDiscovery 
  •  The importance of identifying relevant Electronically Stored Information (ESI) 
  •  Why Properly Preserving and Collecting ESI is vital to your eDiscovery process 

Watch Now!

Tech Tip Tuesday: Moving your Authorization Server

Today’s Tech Tip comes from a most asked question received on our Ipro Community.

Moving your Authorization Server

From time to time we get requests on assisting with moving an authorization server. There are many reasons why someone might want to do this, but if you forget to do some small steps, it will result in having to call Ipro Support to clear everything for you before you can reauthorize. This also affects moving serial numbers for Classic products between machines as well. So to help make things easier the next time you need to move your authorization, here is how to do it without needing to call in.

Online Authorizations
On the ORIGINAL authorization machine, open the Ipro Auth Manager. Note for eScan-IT and Copy+ this can be accessed manually by going to the install location
Click on Authorization Management > Remote Management > Deactivate
Install the Ipro Auth Manager on your NEW authorization machine and input your ClientID and Serial number from the other machine.
If it is already installed, click on Authorization Management > Remote Management > Activate
Ensure you get a Valid status in your Auth Manager

Offline Authorizations
Install the Ipro Auth Manager on your NEW authorization machine and input your ClientID and Serial number from the other machine.
Open the Ipro Auth Manager on the NEW machine
Click on Authorization Management > DAT Management > Export
Save the DAT file somewhere on your computer
Email CSR@Iprotech.com with that DAT file and request for it to be authorized. You should receive a new DAT file from them
Go back to the Ipro Auth Manager and click Authorization Management > DAT Management > Import
Select the new DAT file you received from CSR@staging.iprotech.com
Ensure you see the Valid status in your Auth Manager

For dongle users, the only thing to remember is to move the dongle from the old machine to the new machine. If you for whatever reason can no longer access the Ipro Auth Manager from the ORIGINAL machine and you are using an online authorization, please contact Ipro Technical Support to have us clear your account manually on our end so you can reauthorize on the new machine.

For more tips, be sure to join our Ipro Community.

Tech Tip Tuesday: eCapture

eCapture

We polled our Support team and Ipro Community to find some common questions our product users had and the best resolution. Check back on Tuesdays for more tech tips to help you make the most of your Ipro investment.

Pausing Jobs and How This Could Affect Deduplication: eCapture

If you are ever in the situation where you need to pause a job in eCapture for some reason, then you should know the possible impact this could create with deduplication. In general, pausing a job will not impact anything with the job, but this can change depending on other jobs that are running or will be run. Here is an example of something that can happen:

We start a job called Job A. Then we pause Job A and start another job (Job B) in the same custodian.
We are de-duplicating at the custodian level.
Let’s say Job A has processed 10 files before it was paused, one of those files was found in Job B > Job B will list the item as a duplicate of the item in Job A.
Let’s let Job B finish and unpause Job A and let it finish
The last item in Job A was a duplicate of an item in Job B > Job A will deduplicate it out, keeping the item from Job B

In this case both jobs have an item that was deduplicated from the other. Whichever job discovers the item first will be the reference, and all other jobs will mark their items as duplicates, even if one job finishes before the other or if a job is paused. Let’s go over another scenario:

Let’s start Job A and let it get though the same 10 documents again, then pause it
Now we will start Job B and let it finish. One of Job B’s items is a duplicate of one of the items in Job A that is done with processing, and gets deduplicated
Now we delete Job A. What happens to the item in Job B? It still is marked as a duplicate and will still be deduplicated.

Now we are in a problem where an item is getting marked as a duplicate despite the original job being deleted. Normally if we delete Job A before starting Job B, this wouldn’t cause a problem, but because the jobs were active at the same time, the jobs are now “linked” by their duplicate items and deleting one job means potentially re-running the other.

For more tips, be sure to join our Ipro Community.

Should Small Firms Adopt eDiscovery?

To a small law firm, perhaps one of the most anxiety-inducing aspects of eDiscovery is the uncertainty. There is a starting point and an endpoint, but the in-between can be a walk through a minefield. The most significant question of all can be, “Can we do our eDiscovery in-house?”

To help you safely navigate eDiscovery, let’s look at the most common pitfalls you’re likely to encounter and how to get past them.

You Don’t Have a Lit-Support Staff

When people think about discovery, it’s usually teams of attorneys burning the midnight oil, sifting through data to find that smoking gun. It can take an entire supporting staff to manage the technology that gets ESI in front of reviewers. These are the folks whose responsibilities include:

  • Loading data into review systems
  • Keeping the pipeline moving by batching data
  • Handling technical issues that might arise

However, the cost of maintaining or outsourcing work quickly becomes prohibitive, limiting the size of cases you can manage. Fortunately, as eDiscovery has become more common, related technology is making leaps and bounds.

For example, Ipro Tech’s Automated Digital Discovery platform lets organizations of any size implement a workflow where discovery data is automatically copied, processed, filtered and loaded with minimal human interaction. Systems like these can quickly pay for themselves; time and staffing requirements are reduced while more extensive and lucrative cases become feasible.

Your Current Solutions Can’t Scale to Your Projects

The phone rings. It’s the case of a lifetime. You eagerly agree. But fast forward a few months; megabytes become terabytes, and your eDiscovery platform is redlining trying to keep up.

It’s critical to remain aware of any thresholds your technology might have, and plan accordingly. If you’re expecting to take on bulkier cases, choose an eDiscovery platform for the future. Knowing the options for swappable and burstable licensing is a must before committing to a solution. Does the provider offer both; In the Cloud or Behind the Firewall options?

Make sure you find a veteran provider, like Ipro Tech, who offers live support, training and consulting to ensure clients are never stuck while deadlines loom. Client-focused providers often have service teams, like Ipro’s Professional Services, which are deployed to provide clients with any necessary support from implementation to project management.

Technology & Millennials: Why Your Firm Needs Both

Within the last few years, technology has gradually integrated into all aspects of the legal industry, which means it no longer relates solely to internal functions such as time and billing records. Technology is an essential part of the legal supply chain as it is used to streamline services, reduce costs, and make services accessible to smaller companies. We see technology used in every facet of legal practice, from marketing and client relations to discovery and trial presentation.

So what does this mean for litigators? They must be prepared to use available technology to make their practices more efficient and serve their clients’ needs. Otherwise, litigators risk falling behind in today’s fast-moving legal market.

But what we have seen over and over again are lawyers who don’t embrace new technology. Many live by the mantra, “Don’t fix it if it isn’t broken.” However, as these litigators hesitate to put down their padfolio in exchange for a laptop, they are limiting their effectiveness with a case.

But don’t dive headfirst into an intense study of all the possible technological solutions available. You actually don’t need to worry about understanding the ins and outs of all legal technology. Just hire some millennials.

We have been told countless times that millennials and technology go together like bread and butter. But why are young people and tech so inseparable? Millennials may have fewer walks around the block than you, but those walks have been immersed with technology. They saw the creation of AOL and the advancement of the iPhone; using technology, whether unfamiliar or well-known, comes naturally. Even their time in law school was more technology-infused compared to that of prior generations. The key to success in any industry is to allow millennials to leverage their innate technological abilities.

The best place to start is being willing to grasp new technical concepts; then quickly and efficiently apply the latest technology to the practice of law. Firms of all sizes should rely on their young millennial lawyers to insert technology into their practices wherever possible to avoid falling behind. Strive to provide opportunities for young millennial lawyers to take leadership roles on firm committees designed to bring technological advances to the business. Giving them a voice concerning technology will allow your firm the company to embrace technology for the better. Additionally, it will provide your young lawyers with a chance to take a leadership role in the firm early on in their career, giving them a vested interest in the growth and success of the company.

Working with millennials and technology can be unfamiliar and require some adjustments, but it will make all the difference for your firm, starting now.

How to Have a Work/Life Balance in a 24/7 Working World

We hear it all the time:

“I can’t have lunch; I’m slammed.”

“I would, but I’m wrapped around the axle.”

“I can’t train the new guy; I’m too busy.”

“I can’t make the game because I have a deadline.”

And the list of excuses about work goes on and on.

Let’s face it, eDiscovery is hard. We all know the challenges of working within and servicing the litigation profession and yet, we are still here. Times are tough, data is growing, and finding the people we need on our staff is like searching for a pink unicorn.

I have learned the hard way just how demanding our industry can be. I put in the long hours, skipped time with family, worked through every vacation and just about reached my breaking point. Fortunately, I learned a few things along the way that had I known 15 years ago, my life would have been much more in balance. As a leader, I try to leverage my experience to help my team and colleagues work smarter, not harder.

My secret formula? Process + Workflow + Technology + People = Balance

First, inefficient processes are the broken foundation that creates chaos in a business such as ours. Starts and stops, single-points of failure, and relying on that one person who remembers everything is a recipe for disaster. Evaluate the processes, find the waste, eliminate unnecessary steps, and create a system that works for you. Document and distribute processes and procedures to all staff, and make sure they understand those methods. Accountability will become much easier.

You have documented processes, but what is the workflow? How many people are touching, editing, and approving a given project? Where are all the places that the project sits and waits? Automate as much as possible to ensure that the ball keeps moving even when key staff are unavailable or working on other projects. Be sure to build in reliable tracking mechanisms throughout the process to ensure that all necessary information is available to everyone.

When it comes to tracking and workflow, it is important to leverage technology solutions to keep everyone in the loop and make information available universally. Transparency in projects creates a better and stronger working environment and reduces emails and phone calls trying to figure out what is going on. A centralized system is critical to reliable processes and smart workflow.

Finally, empower the people on your team to make appropriate decisions rather than create a bottleneck by making everything go through you. Allow your employees or teammates to take full responsibility for their job and be available to help when necessary. Also, cross-train other staff or junior members of the team to create a dependable bench. Scalability is challenging to do when only a couple of people have the skills and understanding to do a specific task. Be prepared by having a diverse team that can cover for each other in the event of vacations, illness, and turnover.

Is every day going to be a perfect balance of productivity and time at home? Probably not. But by creating an environment with the right technology, efficient processes, fluid workflows, and dependable people, you’ll be capable of accomplishing so much more while still enjoying the great little moments that life will bring you.

The Anatomy of Troubleshooting

While technology can be beneficial and efficient, sometimes things just don’t work (as we have all experienced). And, it always seems to stop working at the worst possible moment. You try everything you can to fix the issue, but with the stress of preparing a case and trying to stick to a strict timeline, it’s easy to become frustrated. You finally decide to call technical support with the hope that someone can help you out.

When any customer or client calls in for help, we want to make sure they have the best experience possible.

There is a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes for our support team while we are on the phone with you; we review past calls, research your company and software, and try to diagnose your current issue. Understanding the process can help your experience go more smoothly.

With all support calls, we use the “Dig DEEP” methodology, which stands for Data, End User, Environment, and Program. By identifying the symptoms of your problem and linking it to one of these four categories, we can fully solve the issue, instead of giving you a temporary fix.

When a customer calls in, we listen first. We may ask follow-up questions to get a better understanding of the issue, such as:

  • Are the results consistent?
  • Does this happen to other users or computers?
  • Does it happen with particular file types?

Because this industry involves time-sensitive projects with very short deadlines, we will ask about the level of severity for the issue:

  • Is there a time constraint we are working against?
  • Is this causing a work stoppage and preventing further work and deliverables?

At this point during the call, we categorize the issue with DEEP. Typically, problems that are Data or End User related can be solved rather quickly, while issues with Environment and/or Program are more challenging to fix. When we classify a problem as Data or End User, we test the issue by repeating the steps taken by the user or checking our dataset with the software.

If the issue hasn’t been solved at this point, we then check the Environment. Based on the information we gather, we come up with a possible explanation for what may be the cause. Once we know the nature of the problem, we apply a possible ‘fix’ to see if the issue is solved, and if it is, we then create a plan of action that best fits the time constraint and needs of the customer.

We would love for technology to always work correctly, but we also know not everything functions perfectly all the time. So we are here, ready to help you get back on track with your litigation process as quickly as possible.

TrialDirector vs. PowerPoint

You put a lot of time and effort into preparing your case for trial, but how are you going to effectively show your case to the jury? TrialDirector was designed specifically for trial (as you can tell by the name) and is the leading trial presentation software because of the following features:

  • Organize witness workbooks – quickly drag and drop items into a witness folder
  • Apply exhibit numbers – add trial exhibit numbers and other unique identifiers to your case items
  • Search transcripts and create designations – generate PDF reports to print, email, and share
  • Make exhibit lists – TrialDirector creates Word documents that you can save, print, or copy into other files
  • Present documents and video in a variety of ways to maximize your presence in front of the jury
  • Zoom, highlight, and use a variety of mark-up tools for maximum impact and understanding

“Eh I’m good, I use PowerPoint.”

We agree that PowerPoint is an excellent presentation program. It creates linear presentations that you can make in advance. So why take the time to learn TrialDirector? Putting aside all the functions listed above (which PowerPoint can’t do, by the way), let’s focus on the presentation.

When you’re presenting to a jury, you need to adapt, be quick on your feet, and prepare for the unexpected. For instance, a document might suddenly be admissible, or the witness answers your question in court differently than in his deposition. What do you do – take a few minutes to create a new PowerPoint slide at counsel’s table? Request a recess? Make the jury wait in silence? You don’t want to lose the impact of expediency.

TrialDirector lets you present any document, any time. You just type in the exhibit number and hit enter; that’s it. You can now continue your questioning about this now-admissible document without missing a beat. When you finish, return to your regularly scheduled presentation organized in a workbook. It’s seamless for you and transparent to the jury.

But don’t worry…

PowerPoint has a place in your case and it has a place in TrialDirector! We know that PowerPoint is ideal for opening statements. Create your opening in PowerPoint and easily load it into your TrialDirector case. TrialDirector will display your PowerPoint presentation and you can move through the slides at your pace, just as you would in PowerPoint.

Ready for closing arguments? Insert the images you showed the jury through TrialDirector into your PowerPoint closing. This will enhance memory and recall. Jurors will not only remember the document, they’ll remember what you showed them.

So, you use PowerPoint? That’s not a problem, because TrialDirector doesn’t make you choose. Use the comfort of PowerPoint along with the flexibility and power of TrialDirector to make your case.

How to Get 10/10 on Your Next Trial Presentation

Some people just have it.

The confidence, the perfect rhythm and speed of talking, the right vocabulary and stories…everything to make a stellar presentation. They could be talking about the importance of tying your shoes with two loops instead of one, and you would still leave the room feeling inspired to be a better person.

But what about those of us who just don’t have it? You’ve spent weeks and months collecting evidence, annotating exhibits, and constructing your argument, but without a good presentation, all that effort might not matter.

In addition to having stellar trial presentation software, here are some tips to help you engage the jury and give a worthwhile presentation:

  1. Be Yourself. Yes, it’s cliché, but it has power. You have a unique personality, whether that is outgoing, soft-spoken, serious, light-hearted, confident, or more reserved. To be effective and confident while you’re presenting, you need to do what comes naturally. Talking too slow can be just as distracting as talking too fast. The jurors may not have law degrees, but they can tell when you’re faking enthusiasm or solemnity. Your strongest asset is to be natural.
  2. Don’t give them the whole pie. Imagine your favorite dessert, whether that be mint brownies, hazelnut cheesecake, or raspberry pie. You eat one bite of that dessert, and that delicious spoonful leaves you craving more. Now imagine how you would feel if you ate a whole giant pan of that dessert in one sitting. You would probably be sick to your stomach and ready to swear off sugar for the next 6 months. The same concept applies to your presentation; your videos, depositions, and annotated exhibits are great elements, but it’s possible to have too much of good thing. Make sure to give your jury a bite of the case instead of overwhelming them with too much information.
  3. Practice. You know the saying, “Practice makes perfect”. Practicing can be mundane and repetitive by nature, but the more you practice, the more confident you’ll be. Your presentation will flow smoothly, and you’ll be better able to handle any last-minute revisions or curveballs that get thrown your way during a trial.
  4. Don’t let technology control you. Your technological tools are meant to enhance your presentation, not replace you as the presenter. Ultimately your words are going to have the biggest impact on the jury, not the annotated exhibit on the screen. You provide the necessary commentary and explanations to give meaning and purpose to the evidence; without you, the jury sees a random collection of videos and images. Don’t underestimate your influence in the courtroom, and make sure the technology doesn’t overpower your argument.
  5. Involve your audience. The jurors in the courtroom have experiences and circumstances that strongly impact their perspectives and decisions. If you truly know your audience, you can communicate in a way that helps them to see the personal relevance of the trial. If one of the jurors is a middle school math teacher with three young kids, present in a way that connects his circumstances with your case.

Comment with any tips you use to have a successful trial presentation!

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